Kudos: Excellence in Chemistry, Computer Science, and More

Honors go to four undergraduates and four faculty members.

Kudos is an occasional column that recognizes Dartmouth faculty, students, and staff who have received awards or other honors. Did you or a colleague recently receive an award or honor? Please tell us about it: [email protected].

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Associate Professor of Chemistry Ivan Aprahamian has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. “Achieving Fellow status in the chemical profession denotes to the wider community a high level of accomplishment as a professional chemist and one who must have made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of the chemical sciences,” writes the society. The society, founded in 1841, is the United Kingdom’s professional body for chemical scientists and the largest organization in Europe for advancing the chemical sciences. “I am honored to be named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and by the RSC's recognition of the work done by my research group,” Aprahamian says.  

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Tamara Gomez-Ortigoza ’21 is among eight students in the nation chosen to participate in the 2018 Karel Fellowship in Public Interest Communications. Over the past six years, the fellowship has matched first-generation and/or minority students with leading nonprofits in the Washington, D.C., area, where they work on social justice issues under the guidance of a communications mentor. This summer, Gomez-Ortigoza will be interning at Families USA, a nonprofit that is dedicated to giving all people access to high-quality care.

Randall Balmer, the John Phillips Professor in Religion, has received a Doctor of Humane Letters from University of the South. He also gave the commencement address for the School of Theology on the same occasion.

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Peter Winkler, the William Morrill Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, has been appointed to the Mathematics Advisory Board for National Museum of Mathematics, an award-winning museum located in Manhattan. “The museum highlights the role of mathematics in illuminating the patterns and structures all around us. Its dynamic exhibits, gallery, and programs are designed to stimulate inquiry, spark curiosity, and reveal the wonders of mathematics,” says the museum’s website. “The museum’s innovative exhibits will engage folks from 105 to 5 years old—and even younger.”

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Uma Ramesh ’20, Sahaj Shah ’21, and Jenny Chen ’21 have been chosen from thousands of applicants around the world by the Clinton Foundation to attend the 11th Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) University meeting this fall at the University of Chicago, which will be hosted by former President Bill Clinton. According to its website, “each year CGI U brings together more than 1,000 student leaders from over 75 countries and 250 schools to develop commitments to action: new, specific, and measurable initiatives that address challenges on campuses and in communities around the world. Students are accepted to the meeting on a competitive basis based on the strength of their commitment to action.” Kevin Sturm, the foundation’s chief executive officer, writes that “this is an exciting accomplishment for these students and a testament to your school’s commitment to social impact education.”

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Lawrence Kritzman, the Pat and John Rosenwald Research Professor in the Arts and Sciences and a professor of French and comparative literature, has received the title of Commander of the Order of Academic Palms (L’Ordre des palmes Académiques) from the French government—the highest honor awarded to an academic in France, and one that is only rarely given to scholars who are not French nationals. The order was first established by Napoleon I in 1808. Kritzman, a scholar of the French Renaissance, now holds all three of its ranks—chevalier (knight), officier (officer), and now commandeur. In 2002, he also received the Legion of Honor and the Order of National Merit, the highest and second-highest civilian honors in France, respectively.  

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Dartmouth ranks among the 40 top colleges for Jewish students, according to the Jewish newspaper AlgemeinerDartmouth Hillel has many social events for its approximately 450 Jewish students, including a special weekly Thursday night event for freshmen, writes the paper. “Along with that, the Hillel hosts three different bagel brunches every semester, providing an opportunity to mingle and carb-load at the same time. The kosher dining options are pretty good for such a small campus; there are kosher offerings available in the main dining hall and a kosher kitchen at the Hillel,” says the paper.